NC State University College of Vetinary Medicine

Making Global Health a Priority


NC State faculty research helps bolster the university’s academic reputation and solve global challenges. Sid Thakur seeks to address one of those challenges — infectious diseases — through his work in the College of Veterinary Medicine.

Thakur, an associate professor in the Department of Population Health and Pathobiology and Associate Director at the Comparative Medicine Institute (CMI), focuses on antimicrobial drug resistance that impacts humans and animals. Antimicrobial resistance is a huge concern where antibiotics used to treat infectious diseases become ineffective for a variety of reasons. READ MORE

New Evidence Emerges on Spread of Antibiotic Resistance Through Soil


New research from the North Carolina State University, US reveals yet another strong evidence of environmental spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), this time, soil being the route of transmission. The research led by Siddharth Thakur shows the spread of Salmonella plasmids carrying genes that are responsible for conferring resistance characteristics in the bacteria in the environment after manure application. Plasmids are small, circular and double-stranded DNA carried within a cell and which can be transferred among different bacteria in animals as well as humans.

CVM Receives Funding to Continue GenomeTrakr Program


In just one year, the GenomeTrakr program at the NC State College of Veterinary Medicine has mapped the intricate genetic fingerprints of 700 strains of pathogenic bacteria.

It's just the beginning.

A new grant from the National Institutes of Health and the United States Food and Drug Administration will fund the program at the CVM for two more years and help it expand globally. READ MORE

To Surveil and Protect: The Fight Against Antimicrobial Resistance


In the thick of war it pays to know your enemy, and bacteria is an unrelenting, captivating foe.

"How does something that you can't see, that doesn't have a brain, develop very sophisticated survival mechanisms almost immediately?" said Paula Cray, head of the department of population health and pathobiology at the NC State College of Veterinary Medicine. "You have to be in awe that something has been here since the beginning of time and has outsmarted the smartest of us.

"That is the grand challenge. How do you tame this beast?" READ MORE

Pass It On: Bacteria Can Spread Antibiotic Resistance Through Soil


When most people think about bacterial antibiotic resistance, they think about it occurring in bacteria found in people or animals. But the environment surrounding us is a huge bacterial reservoir, and antibiotic resistance can be passed between bacteria in the environment, including in the soil. READ MORE

Stopping Foodborne Illnesses In Their Tracks


You'd hardly give it a second glance, this new equipment tucked away in the back of a lab on the fourth floor of the Research Building at North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM), but it has the power to help the millions affected by foodborne illnesses each year.

About the size of an old-school Mac computer, the MiSeq System easily blends in with its surroundings in the lab of Siddhartha "Sid" Thakur, an associate professor of molecular epidemiology at the CVM. It looks similar to any lab machine found across campus. But it is here where hundreds of isolated pathogens will undergo whole genome sequencing and fed into a sharable worldwide database. The goal: identifying the pathogen early and preventing it from spreading.

It's called GenomeTrakr. And the CVM is the only place you'll find it in North Carolina. READ MORE

Antibiotic-Resistant Pathogens Persist in Antibiotic-Free Pigs


Researchers from North Carolina State University have found identical strains of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter Coli (C. coli) in both antibiotic-free (ABF) and conventionally raised pigs. This finding may indicate that these antibiotic-resistant pathogens can persist and thrive in the environment, regardless of antimicrobial usage by pork producers. READ MORE

NC State University College of Veterinary Medicine Joins FDA in Study of Salmonella in dogs, cats


Researchers at North Carolina State University's College of Veterinary Medicine have joined forces with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to study the prevalence of Salmonella infections in pet dogs and cats.

Dr. Siddhartha Thakur, assistant professor in the Department of Population Health and Pathobiology and a member of the Center for Comparative Medicine and Translational Research (CCMTR), is the principal investigator of the study at NC State. READ MORE

CVM Studies Feral Pig Population for Evidence of Salmonella

Roaming feral pigs have established populations in 37 of our 50 states, causing an estimated $800 million in damage annually. And they may be sharing much more than just space with their domesticated brethren. Feral pig populations are exploding across the U.S., but there is not much data on the potential threat they may pose from an epidemiological perspective.

Dr. Siddhartha Thakur and colleagues from North Carolina State University aimed to remedy this situation. They collected fecal samples from feral pigs caught in eastern North Carolina to determine whether the pigs could be reservoirs of Salmonella and Clostridium difficile (C. diff.), common pathogens that are of concern to the swine industry due to their effect on domesticated pigs and their increasing frequency of resistance to multiple antibiotics. READ MORE

Researcher to Study Salmonella in 'Drug-Free' Pigs


A North Carolina State University researcher has received a three-year, $592,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to study the occurrence of Salmonella in pigs that haven't been given anti-microbial drugs either for treatment or growth promotion.

Dr. Siddhartha Thakur, assistant professor of swine health and reproduction, will take samples from pig populations, their environments, and pork processing plants to determine the strains of the Salmonella pathogen that these pigs may be exposed to, as well as the rate of infection in these environments. READ MORE

Dr. Thakur Recipient of USDA Grant


Dr. Siddhartha Thakur, assistant professor of swine health and reproduction in the Department of Population Health and Pathobiology, has received a three-year, $592,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to study the occurrence of Salmonella in pigs that haven't been given anti-microbial drugs either for treatment or growth promotion.

Dr. Thakur, a member of the Center for Comparative Medicine and Translational Research, will take samples from pig populations, their environments, and pork processing plants to determine the strains of the Salmonella pathogen that these pigs may be exposed to, as well as the rate of infection in these environments. READ MORE